Single Parents/Father Lawyer

Who is Single Parent?

A single parent is a parent with one or more children, who is not living with the child [ren]’s other parent. The definition of single parenthood may vary according to local laws of nations or provinces.

 

Single parenthood may occur as a result of loss (death of spouse, separation, divorce, abandonment by one parent), or by choice (single parent adoption, donor insemination, egg donor/surrogate motherhood, choosing to carry to term an unexpected pregnancy and raise the child on one’s own).

 

More than 25% of children in the U.S. live with only one parent (U.S. Bureau of Census, 1997). Research about the welfare of children in single parent families varies. Many factors influence the outcome of how children fare: parent’s age, education level, and occupation, family income, family’s support network from friends and extended family members (including the absent parent if available).

 

Further, outcomes in families where single-parenthood is chosen is frequently better, as the single parent is typically older, has established employment and social supports, and has considered the pros and cons of raising a child alone.

Basics knowledge of Single Parent:

What is a Single Father?

Single Father:

About three in ten children live in a single parent home. The most common type of single parent home is one with only a mother. However, single father homes are the fastest growing type of family situation; the amount of single fathers has grown by 60% in the last ten years alone. This is mainly due to some sort of disaster that has happened to the mother. Loss of a partner may cause the single parent to be financially burdened due to the fact that one of the “breadwinners” is gone. If the single parent is the breadwinner, he or she has less opportunity to work than before, when another parent was available, unless another person is available to care for the child or children.

 

There are various legal aspects that are associated with single parenthood and guidance from an expert attorney ensures your best interests are protected. Issues related to single parenthood are complicated and need an expert handling. An attorney is well versed in law related to single parents and knows the intricacies involved in such cases. A lawyer is your representative in the court and fights for your rights.

Why you need Single Parent issue Attorneys?

  • Attorneys make you aware of your rights
  • Experienced lawyers are adept in dealing with issues related to Single parents
  • Attorneys can best fight for your rights and help you get justice
  • Issues related to single parents are sensitive
  • Lawyers file necessary appeals on your behalf
  • Attorneys assist you right from the framing of the case to courtroom litigation

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